What is account-based sales?

Account-Based Sales (ABS) is a form of business where the customer pays for products or services after they have been delivered. This type of business model can be used by companies that provide goods and services online. In this case, the company does not receive payment until the client has received their product/service. The benefits of using ABS are that the company is able to track how many units were sold, what price was set per unit, and how much profit was earned per sale. The disadvantages include the fact that the company cannot see who the customers are, and therefore, it is difficult to market directly to consumers.

Account Based Sales (ABS) is a term used to describe a business model where the company’s revenue comes from its customers’ purchases rather than selling products or services to them. This type of business model can be used by companies that sell their product or service over the internet. In this case, the company earns money through commissions charged to the customer at each step of the buying cycle.

What are account-based sales? Account-based sales (ABS) is a method of selling products where the customer pays for the product after they have received their order. This can be done through various methods including credit cards, PayPal, bank transfers, gift cards, etc.

Why would I want to use this type of sale? There are many reasons why you may choose to use account-based sales over traditional methods of selling. One reason is that your customers do not need to pay until they receive their order. Another reason is that you can offer discounts to your customers if they pay for their orders using certain payment methods.

How does it work? The customer places an order and then receives an email confirmation from us. Once the order has been placed, we send them a shipping notification via email. When the order ships, we charge the card used at checkout. If the customer chooses to pay later, we allow them to set up a payment plan. After the payment is complete, we ship out the order.

PREPARE Presentation System

Every communication with another person is a presentation. We have been giving presentations all our lives. We start off with only a few presentation tools. As babies, we cry, laugh, gurgle, make faces − but, we get our point across. As we age we add language, knowledge and reasoning. Our presentations become more important as our lives become more complex. Remember how many factors you had to consider the first time you convinced your parents to loan you their car to go out with friends on a Saturday night? No doubt, you prepared thoroughly for this presentation because you really wanted it to work.

The greater the importance and complexity of the presentation, the more thoroughly you need to plan.

If you are going to chat over lunch with a friend, you don’t need to prepare your “presentation” at all, of course. If you are going in front of a potential customer to sell them on what your organization has to offer, you must invest considerable time to make your presentation flawless.

The PREPARE Presentation System is a useful guide whenever your presentation requires elements of planning. The PREPARE steps are applicable to one-to-one, small and large group presentations alike. You may use only some steps for less formal presentations, all steps for the more formal. It is a checklist to help you make sure you will give confident presentations that have the impact you intend.

PREPARE Your Purpose: Audiences are not generic. They can vary widely in terms of information they already know, what they think of you, how they currently operate. Analyze your audience to make sure you are not telling them what they already understand or missing something they need.

Who is your audience? Consider the demographics of your audience. Age, gender, cultural influences, type of business, etc. can make a difference in how your audience receives your presentation.

What is your offer? What are the needs of this audience and what are you offering? Be specific − this is the core that focuses your content.

What do you want your audience to know, think, feel, and do? Address each aspect specifically. You may want your audience to understand the technology you offer. You may also want them to feel excited about and buy a new product. This defines your ideal outcome.

What do they already know, think, feel, and do? This includes identifying any preconceived ideas, skepticism or hidden agendas. This step helps prevent being surprised by your audience.

PREPARE your Persuasion Points: Based on your Purpose, how will you influence them to respond in the way you want?

What information do they need? A common mistake is to overwhelm by giving too much information. What are the most relevant facts, figures, trends, etc. that will give the audience the knowledge they need to understand what you can do for them?

What are the benefits? How will their investment help them be more successful? The audience needs to know what is in it for them.

What examples? Give the audience a clear picture of how others have used and benefited from your offer.

What will the audience lose if they do not choose your offer? Remember the “Got Milk?” ads? You don’t want to be stuck with a dry cookie in your mouth and OH, NO! NO MILK! You NEED that milk! Will your audience be less competitive without your offer? Lose money in the long run? Why do they NEED your offer?

PREPARE Your Presence: Dale Carnegie said “People buy people.” You are the face of your company, product and service to the audience.

Are your visuals easy on the eye and uncluttered? Your visuals should be easily readable from the back of the room. Limit each slide or flipchart page to a few bullets, particularly if you are displaying numbers. Bright colors should be used sparingly and only as highlights. There should be minimal and subtle movement of screens, bullets and objects in PowerPoint presentations. All pictures should be relevant to the topic.

When do you want the audience to focus on the visuals? When do you want your audience to focus on you? When you want the audience to look at your visual, step to the side of it. When you want them to look at you, place yourself front and center, and make eye contact with the audience. If possible, turn off the visual when you want attention on you.

Do your handouts match your visuals? This is particularly useful if your technological tools fail!

Is there space on handouts for note-taking? We process information better when we can put it in our own words. We also learn more as we use more of our senses. Make it easy for the audience to see, hear and write.

Is your body language relaxed and non-distracting? 50% of what we communicate is through body language. Look natural.

Is your tone enthusiastic and engaging? Tone conveys 30% of our message. If you do not sound excited about your offer, no one else will be.

Are your words clear and compelling? Since words only convey 20% of the message, make sure you choose them carefully for maximum impact.

PREPARE Through Practice: Know what your presentation sounds and looks like before you are in front of your audience. Find practice partners who will critique your presentation objectively.

Does your timing allow for your presentation and audience interaction? As with any well-planned meeting, a presentation should begin and end on time.

Will you use notes? Notes that list your key points and indicate timing will keep you on track.

Do your practice partners hear your messages in the way you intend? If there is a chance for the audience to misunderstand, they will. This is a make or break factor.

My next Ezine article will give simple tips to organize your presentation.

Negotiate Successfully by Using Debating Techniques

In the last negotiation lesson, I expounded on the benefits that proper positioning has and the role it plays, before, during, and after negotiating. This lesson expands upon that theory and takes into account how any negotiator can enhance the outcome of a negotiation by using a few debating techniques.

Positioning:

First, I’d like to cite an experience I encountered at a conference at which I recently spoke. There was a very powerful speaker who spoke on the topic of leadership. I heard him speak in the past, but this time I was moved by his words to the point that I wanted to purchase the DVD set he offered for the continuation of the expansion of one’s mind. As luck would have it, a lady in front of me purchased the last set. She heard me exclaim how I couldn’t believe the bad luck I had to miss purchasing the set. Then, this well poised and well spoken women, turned to me and said, ‘you can have it’. I looked at her suspiciously for about 30 seconds and in my mind, I was wondering what she might want in return (read between the lines if you wish. she had already paid for the set and she was giving it to me for free). It was as though she read my mind when she said, ‘there are no strings attached’. She gave me her contact information and said I could send the set to her after I’d listened to it. As it turned out, this woman whose name is Tori really didn’t want anything in return, but due to her generosity, I’ll assist her in her endeavors in the future.

In the above example of positioning, Tori was not seeking anything from me, but think of what you can do before entering into a negotiation that can endear you to whom you’re negotiating.

After you endear yourself, how can you utilize debating techniques to enhance your negotiation position? The following are a few debating techniques and how they are related to negotiation tactics and strategies.

Debating Techniques:

When debating and negotiating, there are certain principles you should follow …

Clarity: When debating, you should understand the argument.

When you negotiate, you should always confirm your understanding of why you’re negotiating. You should also confirm the other person’s understanding, and get their perception, of what is being negotiated; the reason for doing so is to make sure everyone involved in the negotiation is ‘on the same page’.

Accuracy: When debating, you need to ask yourself if what you hear is true and can it be proven.

When you negotiate, you should at a minimum, mentally question the validity of information presented to you. You should also observe the body language and manner in which information is presented. If you observe the body language of the person you’re negotiation with, you could discern hidden or additional information in the message.

Precision: When debating vague assertions can be assumed to be true until exceptions disprove them.

When you negotiate, if the person’s words that you’re negotiating with are not synchronized with their body language, you can allow the person to continue to unveil their method of ‘bending the truth’ to the point that you’ve gathered enough knowledge of how they use their body when lying. In so doing, you’ll acquire insight into how they lie and you’ll be able glimpse the inner workings of their mind and the mannerisms displayed when doing so.

Depth: When debating, you should observe the comprehensiveness of an argument. In essence, listen for that which is not stated that could prove to be a benefit to your position.

When you negotiate, you should listen for the unspoken word, observe body language, and take note of how unspoken words are used (this is not an oxymoron). In a lot of negotiation situations, that which is not said can speak more loudly than the words that are spoken. You should also take note of words used that could contain dual meanings. Keep in mind when negotiating, just because someone offers a comprehensive rebuttal to a request, doesn’t mean you have to subjugate your position to theirs.

Breadth: When debating, give consideration to whether the argument covers all of the possibilities.

When you negotiate, initially, you should not display your full intentions until you’re somewhat sure that you can get that which you seek from the negotiation. In essence, you cannot allow yourself to become enveloped in a haze when it comes to disclosing your intent of the negotiation less you lose your negotiation advantage.

Logic: When debating you should consider the impact of fallacies in an argument.

When negotiating, a good negotiator can make a plausible argument using false or invalid inferences, the purpose of which may be to heighten the appearance of red herrings. It thus behooves you to be very cognizant throughout all phases of the negotiation.

When negotiating, the more strategies and techniques you’re aware of, and can utilize during negotiations, the better you’ll be at negotiating … and everything will be right with the world.

The Negotiation Lessons are …

- Before negotiating, consider the tactics you’ll employ. Proper planning will give you an additional edge as the negotiation progresses.

- Understand the illusion and value that red herrings can create. When used effectively, they create the opportunity to give something that has perceived value to the person with whom you’re negotiating, but that which has little value to you.

- When negotiating, as is the case when debating, a synchronized plan, aligned with the path that you’ll take to achieve the outcome of the negotiation you seek, will allow you the insight of more maneuverability throughout the negotiation.