Negotiate Successfully by Using Debating Techniques

In the last negotiation lesson, I expounded on the benefits that proper positioning has and the role it plays, before, during, and after negotiating. This lesson expands upon that theory and takes into account how any negotiator can enhance the outcome of a negotiation by using a few debating techniques.

Positioning:

First, I’d like to cite an experience I encountered at a conference at which I recently spoke. There was a very powerful speaker who spoke on the topic of leadership. I heard him speak in the past, but this time I was moved by his words to the point that I wanted to purchase the DVD set he offered for the continuation of the expansion of one’s mind. As luck would have it, a lady in front of me purchased the last set. She heard me exclaim how I couldn’t believe the bad luck I had to miss purchasing the set. Then, this well poised and well spoken women, turned to me and said, ‘you can have it’. I looked at her suspiciously for about 30 seconds and in my mind, I was wondering what she might want in return (read between the lines if you wish. she had already paid for the set and she was giving it to me for free). It was as though she read my mind when she said, ‘there are no strings attached’. She gave me her contact information and said I could send the set to her after I’d listened to it. As it turned out, this woman whose name is Tori really didn’t want anything in return, but due to her generosity, I’ll assist her in her endeavors in the future.

In the above example of positioning, Tori was not seeking anything from me, but think of what you can do before entering into a negotiation that can endear you to whom you’re negotiating.

After you endear yourself, how can you utilize debating techniques to enhance your negotiation position? The following are a few debating techniques and how they are related to negotiation tactics and strategies.

Debating Techniques:

When debating and negotiating, there are certain principles you should follow …

Clarity: When debating, you should understand the argument.

When you negotiate, you should always confirm your understanding of why you’re negotiating. You should also confirm the other person’s understanding, and get their perception, of what is being negotiated; the reason for doing so is to make sure everyone involved in the negotiation is ‘on the same page’.

Accuracy: When debating, you need to ask yourself if what you hear is true and can it be proven.

When you negotiate, you should at a minimum, mentally question the validity of information presented to you. You should also observe the body language and manner in which information is presented. If you observe the body language of the person you’re negotiation with, you could discern hidden or additional information in the message.

Precision: When debating vague assertions can be assumed to be true until exceptions disprove them.

When you negotiate, if the person’s words that you’re negotiating with are not synchronized with their body language, you can allow the person to continue to unveil their method of ‘bending the truth’ to the point that you’ve gathered enough knowledge of how they use their body when lying. In so doing, you’ll acquire insight into how they lie and you’ll be able glimpse the inner workings of their mind and the mannerisms displayed when doing so.

Depth: When debating, you should observe the comprehensiveness of an argument. In essence, listen for that which is not stated that could prove to be a benefit to your position.

When you negotiate, you should listen for the unspoken word, observe body language, and take note of how unspoken words are used (this is not an oxymoron). In a lot of negotiation situations, that which is not said can speak more loudly than the words that are spoken. You should also take note of words used that could contain dual meanings. Keep in mind when negotiating, just because someone offers a comprehensive rebuttal to a request, doesn’t mean you have to subjugate your position to theirs.

Breadth: When debating, give consideration to whether the argument covers all of the possibilities.

When you negotiate, initially, you should not display your full intentions until you’re somewhat sure that you can get that which you seek from the negotiation. In essence, you cannot allow yourself to become enveloped in a haze when it comes to disclosing your intent of the negotiation less you lose your negotiation advantage.

Logic: When debating you should consider the impact of fallacies in an argument.

When negotiating, a good negotiator can make a plausible argument using false or invalid inferences, the purpose of which may be to heighten the appearance of red herrings. It thus behooves you to be very cognizant throughout all phases of the negotiation.

When negotiating, the more strategies and techniques you’re aware of, and can utilize during negotiations, the better you’ll be at negotiating … and everything will be right with the world.

The Negotiation Lessons are …

- Before negotiating, consider the tactics you’ll employ. Proper planning will give you an additional edge as the negotiation progresses.

- Understand the illusion and value that red herrings can create. When used effectively, they create the opportunity to give something that has perceived value to the person with whom you’re negotiating, but that which has little value to you.

- When negotiating, as is the case when debating, a synchronized plan, aligned with the path that you’ll take to achieve the outcome of the negotiation you seek, will allow you the insight of more maneuverability throughout the negotiation.

How To Turn A Five Minute Presentation Into A $200,000 Marketing Bonus

How do you increase your visibility by focussing on ‘high pay off’ activities to build your profile and profits?

Speaking in public is the fastest way to attract, win and even retain more profitable clients.

It is a ‘one to many’ activity that delivers an enormous return on investment for your time and effort.

It also builds your expert power and recognised authority status.

When combined with a good media relations plan it is one of the most powerful and cost effective marketing strategies around.

Here’s a personal case study of how to turn a five minute speech into $200,000 worth of media coverage.

“Malaysia – Opening doors to Australian Business” was the theme for a business breakfast held on March 10th 2006.
Malaysia is Australia’s ninth largest trading partner, with two-way trade between our two countries currently standing at almost $10 billion.

As a Perth-based international business speaker working in Malaysia, I joined James Wise, Australian High Commissioner to Malaysia (left hand side) and Peter Kane, Australian Senior Trade Commissioner to Malaysia and Brunei (right hand side) on the platform at a breakfast function “Meet The Ambassadors” to share firsthand insights on how to tap into the second strongest economy in South East Asia.

The marketing copy for the event was impressive.

“James Wise is a senior career officer with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and has been Australia’s High Commissioner to Malaysia since 2003.

Peter Kane has served as Austrade’s Senior Trade Commissioner in Kuala Lumpur since 2005.

Peter has a wealth of experience gained from assisting Australian exporters in diverse markets across the world for nearly 20 years.”

More than 250 people turned up to the breakfast. Including a columnist for Malaysia’s most influential media vehicle, the The Star newspaper.

So why did the columnist choose to write a full page article about my five minute speech and not the two other more eminently qualified and experienced speakers?

Well, I believe there were five essential ingredients that made it irresistible to the media and journalist.

Here are the insider’s secrets so you can achieve the same amazing success with your next speech.

1. Emotional Connection.

As US speaking coach Doug Stevenson says when he talks about strategic storytelling – making content come alive, “emotion is the fast lane to the brain” and you must feel genuine emotion to connect with your audience.

2. Tell A Story.

Relevant stories are a powerful tool to illustrate key points.

My most relevant personal story to my Malaysian message was my ‘walking barefoot on hot coals experience’ at an Anthony Robbins Unleash The Power Within seminar I attended in Kuala Lumpur with 4,000 other delegates.

Even the world’s most powerful communicators use personal stories. Take for example British Prime Minister, Tony Blair.

He was in Australia for the recent Commonwealth games and gave a speech to federal parliament on March 27th.

His speech was covered in the Australian media and here’s part of that speech and in particular a personal story.

“Australia may not be in my blood, but it surely is in my spirit. My earliest memories are Australian. From the age of two, till five I lived in Adelaide … At uni I was reintroduced to religion by an

Australian Peter Thompson, and introduced to politics by another, Geoff Gallop, both dear friends to this day. I’ve been back many times. I love the people, love the place, always have and always will. Australia is just a very special place to be.”

3. See, Hear and Touch.

Use descriptive words to create visual, auditory and tactile anchor points for your audience.

Paint the picture and create the movie in their minds.

4. Make It Personal.

Share something personal from a place of vulnerability and you create instant rapport with your audience.

5. Have A Strong Call To Action.

Make sure your audience take action after listening to your speech.

If you go to my blog an unedited version of my “Meet The Ambassadors” presentation is available now for you to listen to.

And, here is the story Personal touch to success, Insight Down Under: By JEFFREY FRANCIS that appeared in the Star newspaper.

And how did I come to value this story at $200,000. Well to take out a full-page advertisement in the Star newspaper would cost $50,000. But editorial coverage is four times more credible than an advertisement and you need to multiply the advertising cost by a factor of four.

Now this method is not recommended by industry bodies such as the Public Relations Institute of Australia. But it does provide a useful framework.

And of course, the story is available for the world to see on the Internet.

The Power Is Always In The Present Moment: That’s Where The Spirit Lives

Only ego flows back and forth to an imaginary future and regretful past.

Whenever you encounter some sort of challenge in life, the best way to handle it is to do anything you can to bring yourself back to this present moment. The present moment is all we have, and when we get worried or fearful we become lost-and it’s all happening in the movement of thought.

Whenever you encounter some sort of challenge in life, the best way to handle it is to do anything you can to bring yourself back to this present moment.

The present moment is all we have, and when we get worried or fearful we become lost-and it’s all happening in the movement of thought. Hours and sometimes even days and weeks go by, and the fear gets bigger and bigger; we become totally consumed by our own thoughts.

The instant we can bring our awareness to this very moment, we find peace.

Think of every occasion when you have wasted your time and energy thinking resentful thoughts toward someone. We have all done that. We make up scenarios in our mind of what we are going to tell someone and how he or she is going to respond, and then think of different ways to reply. This goes on and on and on, and it’s all happening in our mind and nowhere else! We are expending energy on that which doesn’t even exist. The person you are feeling resentful toward probably has no idea of the “problem” that you are creating!

Think of all the times you have gone back in memory, remembering something that you consider negative.

What you are actually doing is keeping the events and situations alive and creating more of the same all in your mind, and your mind is reacting to every thought that you keep thinking, not knowing if it actually happened in the past. For the mind it is always happening in the Now.

Every time we worry about the future, we are wasting our energy and time; we are wasting this precious moment by creating the very future we worry about. We can change this in an instant by looking at out troubles from another perspective.

Change the feelings and thoughts first-put your attention on how events feel in the present moment. You don’t have to look at what is, only be aware of your response to it. Whatever reaction we have, we can learn to talk ourselves into a different kind of response.

Stay in the present moment, on a moment to moment basis; that’s where your true self lives.